Eyefodder on tour

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Happy New Year!
After a nice boozy Christmas run-up and hiatus from updating my images, I’ll be back with avengance in the new year. I still have tons of shots from Easter Island, Santiago, Patagonia and Buenos Aires to post; of which there’s some sneak peeks here. And, before heading back home to New York, I’ll be checking out Copenhagen and Iceland for a few days.

I’ve been exceptionally fortunate to travel over a hundred thousand miles this year; next year will be a lot more domestic. I hope I can continue posting some of the interesting things I see on my travels no matter how short they are.

The Rockaways souvenir.
On the travels I’ve been posting to this blog, I try to pick up a small souvenir from each place so I can remember the place. I never set out to get souvenirs from my time at the Rockaways, but I’ve kept two things that will remind me of the place. The first is my pair of work gloves, that lasted me for the first couple of weeks before I wore a hole in the fingers. And for the second, the miracle that is the self-heating MRE (Meal; Ready to Eat).

This is my last post for now on the Rockaways. Perhaps in the spring time I’ll head out there again to do a follow up, or to try and get involved with a volunteer organization involved in the long recovery that they will face. Until then, let’s get back to the exotic travels. When I last posted, I’d just left deepest darkest Peru, next stop Easter Island!

This series of posts document the time I spent in the Rockaways (an area near New York City that was devastated by Hurricane Sandy) with Team Rubicon. If you liked them, please consider reblogging the post to spread the word or making a donation.
The Rockaways souvenir. On the travels I’ve been posting to this blog, I try to pick up a small souvenir from each place so I can remember the place. I never set out to get souvenirs from my time at the Rockaways, but I’ve kept two things that will remind me of the place. The first is my pair of work gloves, that lasted me for the first couple of weeks before I wore a hole in the fingers. And for the second, the miracle that is the self-heating MRE (Meal; Ready to Eat). This is my last post for now on the Rockaways. Perhaps in the spring time I’ll head out there again to do a follow up, or to try and get involved with a volunteer organization involved in the long recovery that they will face. Until then, let’s get back to the exotic travels. When I last posted, I’d just left deepest darkest Peru, next stop Easter Island!

This series of posts document the time I spent in the Rockaways (an area near New York City that was devastated by Hurricane Sandy) with Team Rubicon. If you liked them, please consider reblogging the post to spread the word or making a donation.

photo by Dan Gorman http://danielgorman.tumblr.com/

One last house. My last day at the Rockaways took me to an unusual mission. Most of the work there has involved mucking out water-soaked belongings, removing drywall and insulation; basically stripping homes down to wooden studs so they can begin the long, slow drying-out process. But this house was brick and didn’t have studs. In fact, there wasn’t much left of anything. A fire in the neighbouring house had spread and consumed this two-family home. The roof, most of the walls and the floor had gone. The house and all its contents had been destroyed. Or so it seemed. The goal with this project was to see what, if anything could be salvaged. Gingerly stepping on the charred remains of someone’s material life is tough, both physically and emotionally. At first we sifted down in a small area, removing char and rubble bucket by bucket. Occasionally we would find something that escaped complete destruction: a plate here, or a beanie baby there (in fact *a lot* of Beanie Babies survived).You could see the heat from the fire had been intense; The enamel from a colander had melted; all that was left of a grand piano was the cast-iron harp. And yet over the course of the day we were able to salvage a few memories for this kind family. “Who would do this if we weren’t doing this?” asked Dan “No-one, that’s who…” Doc replied drily And that is what this team of people is about; jumping in and getting their hands dirty when it’s beyond the reach or remit of others. When it just seems like too much work. We didn’t get much out of the wreckage that day. But what we did get out—those few photographs and possessions—made the time we spent there more than worth it.

This series of posts document the time I spent in the Rockaways (an area near New York City that was devastated by Hurricane Sandy) with Team Rubicon. If you liked them, please consider reblogging the post to spread the word or making a donation.

Rockaway Residents. These people have been through hell. Each resident in these pictures has lost some or all of their belongings, walls and floors. They had been without power for a week or three. The lucky ones had been able to stay with friends or family while getting their homes back together. Some grouped together to stay warm and safe in an area with limited resources and danger at night. One resident whose house we were working on told me that she had seventeen people sleeping upstairs at night in a space no bigger than a two bedroom apartment. That said, the people approached the task of recovery with strength and gusto. They all mucked in to work with us and kept going till the task was done. And when it was they would often offer to share what they had. We never would accept any sort of payment; being offered a cup of tea by someone who had just been able to boil water for the first time in weeks was far better compensation.

This series of posts document the time I spent in the Rockaways (an area near New York City that was devastated by Hurricane Sandy) with Team Rubicon. If you liked them, please consider reblogging the post to spread the word or making a donation.

Staying warm in the Rockaways. When you’re working and moving around you don’t notice it. But first thing in the morning, before the sun takes the edge off things, it can be bitterly cold. The wind whips through and just seems to suck bodyheat away. A few donated heaters help (that’s why Conrad, Sue, Becky and Dylan are clustered up so close in that second picture) but it makes you realise how miserable it is for people living out here with no heat, electricity or hot water. —And yes, my hat is *that* orange!

This series of posts document the time I spent in the Rockaways (an area near New York City that was devastated by Hurricane Sandy) with Team Rubicon. If you liked them, please consider reblogging the post to spread the word or making a donation.